More than three quarters of the British population would like to live abroad according to a recent survey.  Reasons given include a desire for better quality of life, the search for better weather and for nine percent the opportunity it would provide for career progression. Do you ever wonder whether you could take your career abroad and what the impact would be? A new book by Thriving Abroad founders Louise Wiles and Evelyn Simpson covers all the bases from the practical to the emotional of moving abroad.  Here, the authors give five reasons why it could be beneficial for your longer-term career development. 

Thriving Abroad

Thriving Abroad

It is a fantastic developmental opportunity.

Moving abroad even if it is for your work, is not only about the job. It represents a complete life change both professionally and personally and comes with benefits and challenges along the way. It will without doubt stretch you; you will have to step out of your comfort zone and by doing so you will develop new knowledge and skills from language to cross cultural communication, team management skills. You will also become more adaptable, flexible and develop the resilience and ability to cope with change - beneficial skills from both a professional and personal perspective.

Companies see international experience as a pre-requisite for leadership roles.

Increasingly companies see international business experience as a key requirement for international leadership roles, so if you are thinking about developing an international career - even one based in the UK - then time spent abroad will pay dividends in your quest to develop your career as a global leader.

Expanding those all important career networks.

One fantastic result of living abroad is that you develop amazing connections with people from all over the world. Living abroad as an expat means you gain access to an amazingly welcoming, supportive, open professional and social network. Expats love to help! They will provide connections and advice, and these connections when well nurtured will be fantastic for the future.

It is career motivating.

Relocating abroad for a new role can re-ignite your career. Perhaps you are finding your current role lacking in challenge and looking to find a role that inspires and motivates you.  A job that serves a purpose and holds meaning for you may be just what you need to bring the mojo back to your career and take you to new career heights. Relocating abroad can also be a fantastic way to find new and brighter opportunities - you just never know what lies around the corner.

You want to break into the top echelons of management.

How can you break into the top management levels in your organisation as a woman? One way to stand out and get noticed is to do something different, to put yourself forward as someone who is prepared to go the extra mile for their career. Female international assignees are under-represented, representing only 25% of assignees in many organisations. There are plenty of organisations looking for women who are prepared to put themselves forward for international roles. Is that you?

Of course, there are both opportunities and challenges involved in making such a big life change. It is not a decision to be made lightly and you should research your options carefully, considering the impact of moving abroad from both a personal and professional perspective before packing your suitcase. If you have a family, then the impact and opportunity for them also needs to be considered carefully. Our new book 'Thriving Abroad: The definitive guide to professional and personal relocation success' is designed to help you do just that. Why not grab a copy, learn about developing an international career and lifestyle and decide whether it could be the right career and life move for you.

Thriving Abroad: The definitive guide to professional and personal relocation success, by Louise Wiles and Evelyn Simpson, is published by Practical Inspiration Publishing, RRP. £18.99.

For more information, visit: www.thrivingabroad.com or connect on Twitter: @thrivingabroad

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