"The chances of falling pregnant are slim, let's just risk it," more than half of British women have thought this at some point in their lives, according to new research.

One in two women run the threat of an unintended pregnancy by taking unnecessary chances with their contraception.

The new research reveals that risk taking is prevalent among all relationship stages with 55 per cent of married women and 71 per cent of women who are dating admitting to having taken a gamble by not using contraception.

The survey of 3,00 women by Bayer HealthCare found that the following reasons were to blame for this behaviour: 39 per cent saud contraception was either something they forgot or didn't consider, while 13 per cent didn't want to ruin the moment and 24 per cent of dating women said they felt pressured to take risks with their contraception.

Dr Caroline Cooper, Sexual Health and Contraception expert, says: "It's shocking that women are taking these risks as there are long-acting contraceptive options that don't have to be remembered every time you have intercourse, allowing women to enjoy a full and active sex life without chancing an unwanted pregnancy.

"Unfortunately awareness about long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is still very low; on average 25 per cent of women are not aware of all the different LARC options such as the intrauterine system (IUS), intrauterine device (IUD), implant and injection."

The study also found that over a third of women admit that they are less likely to use contraception as they get older. Such risk-taking is particularly surprising given that on average, the women surveyed believed their fertility only starts declining at 47.

Last year's abortion statistics confirm that women continue to take risks when it comes to their sex lives; while levels of teenage abortions decreased between 2009-2010, those in their 20s, 30s and 40s showed an increase.

Finally it is not only women in relationships who are taking risks; nearly half of divorced women admit they have had unprotected sex more than five times, despite 92 per cent claiming they're not risk takers in day-to-day life.

Jo Hemmings, Sex and Relationship expert, comments: "The dating game is changing and women are taking more control of their love lives than ever, so it's shocking that some women are taking risks with their contraception because they feel pressured to or don't want to ruin the moment.

"Women should have the confidenct to take control of their contraception and if they don't, they should consider long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) which once fitted, will not have to be remembered each time they have sex,"


by for www.femalefirst.co.uk
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