It is said that a clean home equals a clean mind but is that really the case? Following an in depth survey commissioned by Homejoy, the leading online cleaning platform, it seems that a clean home really does equal a clean mind and a happy home.

According to the data, 42 per cent of women surveyed said that mess and dirt at home are the top causes of stress. At the same time, the act of cleaning can also be very therapeutic for men with 18 per cent admitting that cleaning makes them feel like they are putting the world to rights. 

Psychologist Anjula Mutanda said: “The psychological impact of your living environment can have a profound effect on your happiness and well-being. It is important to make cleaning a priority to ensure you have a happy, healthy home and a clear mind".

The data also reveals that, surprisingly, men actually clean their homes more regularly than women but not necessarily more thoroughly. Four times more men admitted to spraying air freshener to disguise bad smells, rather than cleaning the house.

Clearly favouring the ‘little and often’ approach, 34 per cent of men admit to ensuring only the bedroom is clean and the sheets are changed while 31 per cent of females described themselves as 'top to toe' cleaners.

When looking at the cleaning habits of the next generation, it seems like our cleaning future isn’t as sparkling as we thought. 18-24 year olds are reportedly the least clean generation with 20 per cent saying their cleaning routine consists of 'hiding mess under furniture or in the cupboards’.

Angela Bradbury, UK Country Manager for Homejoy said: “With this latest round of research, we were keen to find out more about the cleaning habits of the British public. We were surprised to hear that twice as many women as men wish their homes were cleaner but don’t have enough time or motivation to clean more regularly.  There are clearly opportunities for Homejoy to help ensure the home is always a happy one.

It seems that not only are our overall cleaning habits slipping but this is also affecting our relationships at home. 51 per cent of Brits cite not taking out the rubbish as the main cause of arguments at home, while 40 per cent of women admit to regularly arguing with the person they live with over whose turn it is to unload the dishwasher.


by for www.femalefirst.co.uk
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