Christian Louboutin

Christian Louboutin

Christian Louboutin has "never" had any "business goals".

The 52-year-old fashion designer - who launched his eponymous label in 1991, which is known for its pillar-box red lacquer on the soles of his shoes - has admitted he didn't intend to start a highly recognised fashion brand when he was younger, and although he never had plans to run his own business and expand it, he has since developed his company to include a beauty capsule as well as a menswear and womenswear footwear range.

Speaking about his brand, he said: "I've never had business goals. I don't understand how people do that."

And the French creative mastermind has revealed some people thought he was "crazy" launching a business when he did.

He explained: "Most people would say it was crazy to start a business then, but I don't think there is a correct moment anyway."

Although Christian has admitted he never had set targets to reach for his business, he has revealed his ultimate aim was to do something he would be "proud" of.

He explained: "Legitimacy is a big thing for me. My goal is to do something I'm proud of. As long as you drive something to the end and do it your way, you'll always be proud. If it's successful, even better."

Christian has admitted he epitomises the type of customer he wants to shop in his worldwide stores.

He said: "Having a store myself, it's one of my missions to be the customer I would like: the person who is excited, happy and takes everything."

Meanwhile, the fashion mogul is set to launch three perfumes called Trouble in Heaven, Tornade Blonde and Bikini Questa Sera to his fashion house, and he has revealed he wanted the bottle to be designed by an architect.

Speaking about his latest beauty venture to the Wall Street Journal Online, he said: "I thought the bottle should be designed by an architect.

"I went to see him [late Oscar Niemeyer] about the project, and he was so sweet. He was already 100 years old. 'I'm completely busy,' he said. 'But I would love to do it if you can wait.' I told him, 'Of course I'll wait,' and then he died."

Christian has since recruited the help of Thomas Heatherwick, who has described the design as a deconstructed "pastry".

Heatherwick said: "I had never worked on designing a bottle, and didn't expect to, and wasn't even sure if I was interested at first, but I enjoyed bouncing ideas around with Christian.

"Finally he asked if I'd consider designing the bottle ... [the result resembles] a pastry where they put a slit in the middle and twist it inside out on itself."