This afternoon Female First are heading to Manchester as Bowling For Soup return, this time supported by UK pop-punkers Orange and ska-pop stars Suburban Legends.

To get ourselves in the BFS party mood, we're taking a look at 10 of their best tracks.

This differs from The Weekend Playlist, in that this is (in order, from 10 through to 1) a countdown of our favourite 10 Bowling For Soup songs, rather than a mixtape set to a theme.

We've decided to include four "Honourable Mentions" that won't get a blurb, but only just missed out on the Top 10.

To strike a balance, we've also gone for a mix of well-known hits and some lesser-known tracks.

Honourable Mentions:
All Figured Out, Graduation Trip, Self-Centered, Today Is Gonna Be A Great Day (Phineas and Ferb)

10. I'll Always Remember You That Way (My Wena b-side)

The dual "female"-male vocals and lyrics give this a nice dynamic in a trademark BFS style, mocking the views of the guy and girl as they turn the "love song" on its head.

9. Really Might Be Gone (A Hangover You Don't Deserve)

From the instantly memorable riff and the power chord-driven verses, this is almost the archetypal pop-punk tune.

Relatable lyrics, a brief pause leading into the main refrain, Jaret Reddick shouting "Yeah!" as the riff kicks in...it's cheesy, but we love it.


8. My Wena (Sorry For Partyin')

What seems like a fairly predictable subject matter from the title is actually a great example of how BFS make the rumour slightly intelligent (...slightly).

This song is a song about Jaret's sausage dog, made to sound like a love song about...well, you can guess. It works on every level, and has some great puns.

7. A Friendly Goodbye (The Great Burrito Extortion Case)

Really, the lyrics from this would be enough on their own to earn this a place, but the fact that they fit into an infectious melody give it a little edge.

Coming up with clever wordplay to avoid swearing, leading a refrain of "So F-U!", BFS aren't one to show restraint, but it helps this song's humour.

6. Punk Rock 101 (Drunk Enough To Dance)

The first of a few obvious ones, there are a few songs we just can't ignore, no matter how often they're played.

For teenage skaters when this was released, it was an anthem, namedropping heroes like NOFX's Fat Mike, whilst nodding to the many cliches of the pop-punk genre ("Don't forget to delay-lay-lay, on the very last word-word-word").

5. Hooray For Beer (Sorry For Partyin')

One of the most recent songs on the playlist, this was taken from the band's 2009 effort.

Another example of their wordplay, this starts as a bit of a love song before becoming (quite blatantly) an ode to beer. It's childish, yes, but it's also undeniably infectious and fun.

4. High School Never Ends (The Great Burrito Extortion Case)

Yes, Bowling For Soup were all well into their 30s when this was released, and there will always be critics wishing they'd stop singing about high school.

Here, it just works, and even the pop culture references fit in nicely without seeming too forced. The "whoa-oh" chorus made it an instant hit and fan-favourite - pure pop-punk gold.

3. The B**** Song (2011) (I've Never Done Anything Like That b-side)

The band recently re-recorded "The Song That Started All" (The B**** Song) for their latest single.

The original will always have its place in our hearts, but here everything sounds crisper, more vibrant and energetic. It stays true to the original recording whilst revamping it in a great way.

2. Belgium (acoustic) (Drunk Enough To Dance)

From acoustic and boy-band to polka and brass-infused rock, this song has seen plenty re-imaginations over the years.

Whilst the brass rock version was the original (taken from Rock On Honorable Ones!!), the acoustic version is so stripped down and honest, it actually feels like the love song it is at heart.

1. Girl All The Bad Guys Want (Drunk Enough To Dance)

Extremely predictable, but sometimes that's no bad thing - this song is arguably the band's biggest and most famous hit, and there are some very good reasons from that.

The riff, the infectious melody, the big break-down: it all works and helps create a perfect 3-minute pop-rock tune of the highest calibre.

Female First - Alistair McGeorge