Sting at The BMI Awards

Sting at The BMI Awards

Sting was honoured with the BMI Icon Award on Monday (10.10.16).

The 65-year-old singer songwriter received the accolade during the 2016 BMI London Awards, which took place at London's The Dorchester hotel last night, and has admitted he feels privileged his songs have been a "soundtrack" for people's lives, although he thinks his title is "premature".

On receiving the award, the 'Englishman in New York' hitmaker said: "Your real job as a songwriter is to provide a soundtrack to people's emotional lives, touchstones for their emotional landscapes, their memories. And that's an unexpected and unanticipated honour as well as a privilege."

However, the star doesn't credit himself as an icon.

Speaking to BANG Showbiz, he said: "Don't call me an icon, please. I don't want to be called an icon. ... It's a bit premature, it's very nice."

The musician - who was formerly a band member in the popular English rock band The Police - was recognised for the title because of his "indelible influence" on musicians throughout his 40-year run at the helm of the music industry.

BMI President and CEO Mike O'Neill presented Sting with the award, which has previously been gained by Bryan Ferry, Queen and Sir Tim Rice.

He said: "[Sting's] unique and indelible influence on generations of music makers."

After receiving the prestigious gong, Sting performed a rendition of 'Message In A Bottle', which was followed by a debut performance of a track on his upcoming album '57th & 9th' called 'Heading South On The Great North Road' before ending his short set with The Police's 1983 hit 'Every Breath You Take'.

The music bash also celebrated Ed Sheeran, who received the Song of the Year Award for his 2014 track 'Thinking Out Loud', whilst Rudimental landed the Pop Award for 'Lay It On Me', which the flame-haired vocalist co-wrote with the group.

Meanwhile, Snow Patrol were credited with the BMI Million-Air Award for their 2006 hit record 'Chasing Cars', alongside Sir Paul McCartney for his 1976 song 'Live and Let Die, Howard Jones' 'No One Is To Blame' and Elton John for 'Don't Go Breaking My Heart' and 'Goodbye Yellow Brick Road'.


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