Married Women Miss Their Maiden Names

Married Women Miss Their Maiden Names

One of the biggest decisions facing women today in Britain is whether to keep their maiden name when marrying their husband.

For a third of women, they feel they made the wrong decision when taking their husbands name and wish they had kept their own.

Just under a third of British women said that they actually disliked their married name and, if they had the chance, they would have kept their maiden name.

Luckily, many women don’t regret taking their husbands name and said that it is a big part of who they are.

A spokesman for Siteopia, who conducted the research, said, “The name we go by forms a big part of who we are and how we see ourselves, whether it’s the name we were given at birth, gained through marriage or a nickname we choose to go by.

“The results show just how much we invest in a name and the connotations we attach to different ones – it’s clear that where we may inherit a name or grow up with one we don’t like, we’ll often look to change or compromise with it.”

To combat hurting their husband’s feelings, one in 14 women have opted to have a double-barrelled surname, combining both hers and her husband’s names.

The study also found that one in five parents regret the name they chose for their child, and the same amount admitted that they would change it if they could.

Would you keep hold of your maiden name if you had the chance? Let us know by commenting below or tweeting us @FemaleFirst_UK


by for www.femalefirst.co.uk
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  1. by Paul Wilson 20th Jun 2013 11:36

    I am a man that has been married for nearly 22 years, I have always thought it dreadful that women should lose their names and adopt there husbands when they get married, but my wife insisted on taking my name! We even had fairly heated rows about it, and eventually I gave in.

  2. by suzzie76 23rd Jun 2013 19:08

    No, I don't miss mine. It was more common and easier for others to spell. My husband never actually asked, but someone else did and I said my family will only have one last name, no hypons. He said then if I wanted we could make a new name using parts of our existing ones. But I was happy just using his.

    I don't see it to be a big deal, I associate with my first name not my last.

    Work wise I kept my maiden name for a while, then it became confusing for others and I changed.

  3. by Whitney Moore 26th Jun 2013 18:57

    After i saw the post of Pamela and Carolyn on how Dr Bola helped them in bringing back their lover, i decided to contact Dr BOLA ,Then i told him how my husband tried divorcing me and a... Read More

  4. by Red head mum 28th Jun 2013 16:48

    Dont miss my maiden name at all, in fact i was quite excited to start a new chapter of my life as Mrs ***** well you didn't think i'd post it up now lol, if it's any consolation to those that mourn losing their maiden name they will get it back on the slab over their grave after the word nee

  5. by mostirreverent 28th Jun 2013 23:14

    You can make your maiden name your middle name. Mine is easy and unique (huh, I'm easy and unique), and whenever I'm out to diner with people, we use mine. The old misses was glad to get rid of the long, hard to pronounce, and often teased about as a kid, Lithuanian name for mine

  6. by franfran 23rd Jul 2013 14:25

    mostirreverent wrote:The old misses was glad to get rid of the long, hard to pronounce, and often teased about as a kid, Lithuanian name for mine


    I went the other way - from a nice straightforward Scottish surname to a name that no-one can pronounce or spell properly unless the can speak Italian.....

  7. by franfran 23rd Jul 2013 14:26

    mostirreverent wrote:The old misses was glad to get rid of the long, hard to pronounce, and often teased about as a kid, Lithuanian name for mine


    I went the other way - from a nice straightforward Scottish surname to a name that no-one can pronounce or spell properly unless they can speak Italian.....

  8. by Red head mum 23rd Jul 2013 22:22

    franfran wrote:
    mostirreverent wrote:The old misses was glad to get rid of the long, hard to pronounce, and often teased about as a kid, Lithuanian name for mine


    I went the other way - from a nice straightforward Scottish surname to a name that no-one can pronounce or spell properly unless they can speak Italian.....

    I went from one easy to spell Scots name to another just as easy to pronounce and spell Scots name, but then being Scots they are all east to me lol xx