This year, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II celebrates 70 years of marriage to His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, making their union the longest royal marriage in British history.

Ted and Doris Box

Ted and Doris Box

To mark the platinum anniversary – and release of a commemorative coin – the London Mint Office1 commissioned research exploring the changing face of marriage over the past 70 years – since the royal couple exchanged vows at Westminster Abbey on the 20th November 1947. 

The London Mint Office organised for Jennie Bond to meet with four remarkable couples who share the rare distinction of being married in the same year as the Queen and Prince Philip to find out what’s kept them together for all these years.

For Lilias Standbrook-Evans, who met her husband Edward at a dance at the Luton Townhall, patience is the key to a successful marriage

Isaac Clement say’s ‘a kiss before he and Margaret go to bed every night’ is the secret.

Ted Box believes it’s doing everything together – although his wife Doris stopped at going to the football with him.

June and Geoff Bancroft, who first met at the tender age of 12 and married at 17, the secret to their longevity is sharing everything together.

For those seeking a lifelong marriage, the study reveals what the British public believe is the secret to a successful marriage. Respect (73%) tops the list followed by having a laughing together (70%).   

Whilst historically men have sought permission for their bride's hand in marriage from her father, only 30% of young married couples (aged 18-34) follow this convention.  

The tradition of women taking their husband's name is also changing. According to research, only 72% of young married couples take their husband's name compared to 97% couples aged 55+, as double-barrelling names becomes more popular (11%) and one in ten men now take on their wife’s surname.

  • 42% younger men proposed on bended knee compared to 19% of older men
  • A fifth of those aged over 75 invested at least three months of salary on the engagement ring (21%), compared to 13% overall

Half of Brits (52%) paid for their own wedding


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