Rap star 50 Cent his thoughts on Robbie Williams, what events and people shaped his life, even the need to wear bullet proof vest's 50 Cent reveals all in the candid interview below with quotes by the great man taken from ITV's Orange Playlist.

Just the two of us, 50 & his mum
"Every time I saw my mum it was like Christmas, you know. She lit up my world. She was very young when she had me, only 15 years old. She had to hussle to take care of me. Teenage pregnancy wasn't as common back then as it is now and she had to figure out ways of providing for both of us. Welfare wasn't an option so she went in a different direction, it wasn't the right direction, but it did mean she was able to provide me with all the nice things. I didn't want for anything. So when she died I lost that sense of security. I lost everything and had to go live with my grandparents. That was a big adjustment for me because they had eight other kids, it was a huge transition. I wasn't used to having that many people around, it was always just me and my mum."
Hussling drugs at the age of 12years old
"I was only 12 years old when I started to hussle. I could only do it between the hours of 3-6pm when my grandparents thought I was at after school programmes. I learned quickly, I had to be aggressive to keep safe. I changed quite a lot during that time in my life. I always had to watch how I presented myself - on the street, when I got back to my grandmothers house. It made me quite quiet because it was difficult living two different versions of me."
Change of Direction, birth of his son
"When my son came along I started to rethink my lifestyle and think of more suitable ways I could provide for him. I could no longer accept the risks anymore, the repercussions of what I was doing. I might be was incarcerated or physically hurt to the point that I might not be able to take care of him, I couldn't take that risk. So I started writing music."
Drugs denial and boot camp
"I spent six months in an alternative jail programme, like a military boot camp, it teaches discipline and physical training. They also had a drug treatment programme that I was in for 22 months that was difficult for me. Although I didn't actually use drugs myself they sent me so that I could see what effect the drugs I sold had on people, so I could make a choice and change direction. It definitely gave me a different out look on the whole aspect of drugs."

The funny thing was that everyone who's in these programme's starts off in denial. So when I walked in and said ‘I don't do drugs' they just looked at me and said ‘It's ok he's new, he'll learn it's ok to admit it. We hear this all the time'. The programme was only supposed to be 18 months but because I wouldn't tell them I did drugs, because I didn't, they thought I wasn't progressing - so I ended up staying for 22 months!

And the Oscar goes to....
"The film, ‘Get Rich or Die Trying, is about 75% factorial, some situations we exaggerated and others we played down so that the story would make sense. I feel really proud of it; it's probably one of my biggest projects. The reviews I've received have been great, but I don't think this film makes me an actor. It's given people a reference to me possibly being an actor, but I don't consider myself one."
Poster boy
"There was a lot of controversy over the poster for the film because there's a gun in it. Well there were 18 other films released this year with guns shown on the posters. A gun is cheap action. The largest form of entertainment for humans is death, because it's our fate. We know for a fact we're all gonna die and we like to see that in the movies. Anything life threatening or risky is entertainment. If a man jumps off a bridge onto a moving train it has to look like they really did it. But we know what would really happen if someone jumped off a bridge onto a moving train, they're not gonna make it."

I think there's more violence in the Matrix than in my film. There's more violence in the James Bond films and posters than mine. I thought the poster captured me as a protector and that's the theme of the film. I have a baby in my hand and a gun behind me, that shows I'm protecting the child. I thought all the images made perfect sense. I wouldn't just do it for the sake of it.

Big boys don't cry
"I did all the fight scenes in the film myself. I found it easier to concentrate on the physical actions than delivering dialogue and matching emotions to what they wanted. When it came time for me to cry on cue, that was difficult. The nude scene was also difficult, I didn't know if 50 should be naked, but it's real life so we did it."
From rapper to rock star
"I like rock music. I like the way the tempo and energy can change from soft to really hard and loud. The energy just goes up and down and I find that very exciting. One of my favourite bands is U2. We share the same label so Bono is a good friend of mine. I like the White Stripes as well; their first album was really good. I also like Maroon 5, they're cool."
First meeting with Eminem
"The first time I met Eminem he had flown me out to LA. He'd heard some of the stuff I'd put out on the mix tape circuit and he wanted to meet me. He was on the radio that morning and told the radio host that I was his favourite rapper, I didn't actually hear that until I was on my way to meet with him. When I met him he was so excited about doing a project with me, he was so excited he made me nervous! People feel like they know everything about him because of the issues raised in his songs. It's like everyone thinks they know all about his issues with his mum, Haley etc. So Curtain Call was just him saying ‘The shows over folks'."
Robbie takes on 50Cent
"Someone from Robbie Williams camp contacted me and said Robbie would like to meet me, sit down and have a talk. My schedule wouldn't actually allow me to go meet with him even though we were both doing the same show. There was a massive crowd of people at the show, some to see me, some to see him, and it was so manic I just didn't get a chance to meet him. Later the papers reported that he'd said some things about me. I did finally get to meet him in Germany when we were both doing a talk show. We talked for a while and he seemed a nice guy. So I figured he didn't say anything bad about me and the papers must have just made stuff up. So I can honestly say me and Robbie don't have a beef, we're good, we're cool."
Bullets
"I do wear a bullet proof vest sometimes, mostly when I'm back in New York. I grew up in an environment where the price of life is cheap. Everything can be interpreted from two sides. Some people will look at my life and it may inspire them, others will look at my life and be envious because they are so close to where I was."
Like Father like Son
"I like to think I'm a good parent. My son is great, he's good and smart. I think he's everything I was without the bad circumstances. I discipline him if he's done something he shouldn't have. But it's hard to discipline him when he's done something I know I did as a kid. He definitely has my character, my mannerisms. He'll do something he's not supposed to do but he'll do it exactly the way I would have done it. So I look at him and think, ‘Who told you to do that?'. He thinks I'm a superhero. I don't want to force him into a set direction in life, that's his choice, I can only help make his surroundings as good as possible and hope he's ok."
Matching bullet proof vests
"I wouldn't take my son anywhere where it was necessary for him to wear a bullet proof vest. But there was show we were doing and everyone had to wear the same costume for the effect of the show. He wanted to come on stage so badly, so I got the outfit made up for him - that's why people think I got him a bullet proof vest. But I didn't, we just made it look that way so he could have an outfit to match mine for the show."
50's future plans
"My goals keep changing. Right now, I'm excited about Mobb Deep. Their album is out soon and I'm really excited about it, I actually was the executive producer on the album so I'm really pleased with it. I won't release projects from my artists that aren't up to par. Dr Dre and Eminem, they are the standards I aim for when I make my music so I hold my artists to that same standard."
Going back to your roots
"I go back to my neighbourhood in Queens sometimes, usually when I'm feeling creative. I'll go sit on the bench I used to sit on and watch what's going on. My grandparents don't live in our house any more but they still own it. My spot in the basement is still there, I go back to it sometimes. It helps me get back that perspective of wanting to be successful so much. I can remember so many things when I go back there."
Money's too tight to mention
"I'm not really afraid of much. I'm conscious of people that aren't aware of their finances though. I've seen a lot of artists go up and come right back down again. We build entertainers up in order to destroy them, for the sake of entertainment. They adjust to this fabulous lifestyle and they think they're gonna life that way for the rest of their lives. When the finances come in at a really fast rate they adjust to it and stay at that pace even after the finances slow down. Then when they finally realise they've over done it they have to file for bankruptcy. I have great reminders not to end up like that. I wake up in my house every day knowing that the man that sold it to me did so because he couldn't afford to keep it, even though he earned $500million in his career - I own Mike Tyson's home in Connecticut."

Catch the full interview on Wednesday 1st February, ITV1 at 11.00pm, repeated on ITV2.

Rap star 50 Cent his thoughts on Robbie Williams, what events and people shaped his life, even the need to wear bullet proof vest's 50 Cent reveals all in the candid interview below with quotes by the great man taken from ITV's Orange Playlist.
Just the two of us, 50 & his mum
"Every time I saw my mum it was like Christmas, you know. She lit up my world. She was very young when she had me, only 15 years old. She had to hussle to take care of me. Teenage pregnancy wasn't as common back then as it is now and she had to figure out ways of providing for both of us. Welfare wasn't an option so she went in a different direction, it wasn't the right direction, but it did mean she was able to provide me with all the nice things. I didn't want for anything. So when she died I lost that sense of security. I lost everything and had to go live with my grandparents. That was a big adjustment for me because they had eight other kids, it was a huge transition. I wasn't used to having that many people around, it was always just me and my mum."
Hussling drugs at the age of 12years old
"I was only 12 years old when I started to hussle. I could only do it between the hours of 3-6pm when my grandparents thought I was at after school programmes. I learned quickly, I had to be aggressive to keep safe. I changed quite a lot during that time in my life. I always had to watch how I presented myself - on the street, when I got back to my grandmothers house. It made me quite quiet because it was difficult living two different versions of me."
Change of Direction, birth of his son
"When my son came along I started to rethink my lifestyle and think of more suitable ways I could provide for him. I could no longer accept the risks anymore, the repercussions of what I was doing. I might be was incarcerated or physically hurt to the point that I might not be able to take care of him, I couldn't take that risk. So I started writing music."
Drugs denial and boot camp
"I spent six months in an alternative jail programme, like a military boot camp, it teaches discipline and physical training. They also had a drug treatment programme that I was in for 22 months that was difficult for me. Although I didn't actually use drugs myself they sent me so that I could see what effect the drugs I sold had on people, so I could make a choice and change direction. It definitely gave me a different out look on the whole aspect of drugs."

The funny thing was that everyone who's in these programme's starts off in denial. So when I walked in and said ‘I don't do drugs' they just looked at me and said ‘It's ok he's new, he'll learn it's ok to admit it. We hear this all the time'. The programme was only supposed to be 18 months but because I wouldn't tell them I did drugs, because I didn't, they thought I wasn't progressing - so I ended up staying for 22 months!

And the Oscar goes to....
"The film, ‘Get Rich or Die Trying, is about 75% factorial, some situations we exaggerated and others we played down so that the story would make sense. I feel really proud of it; it's probably one of my biggest projects. The reviews I've received have been great, but I don't think this film makes me an actor. It's given people a reference to me possibly being an actor, but I don't consider myself one."
Poster boy
"There was a lot of controversy over the poster for the film because there's a gun in it. Well there were 18 other films released this year with guns shown on the posters. A gun is cheap action. The largest form of entertainment for humans is death, because it's our fate. We know for a fact we're all gonna die and we like to see that in the movies. Anything life threatening or risky is entertainment. If a man jumps off a bridge onto a moving train it has to look like they really did it. But we know what would really happen if someone jumped off a bridge onto a moving train, they're not gonna make it."

I think there's more violence in the Matrix than in my film. There's more violence in the James Bond films and posters than mine. I thought the poster captured me as a protector and that's the theme of the film. I have a baby in my hand and a gun behind me, that shows I'm protecting the child. I thought all the images made perfect sense. I wouldn't just do it for the sake of it.

Big boys don't cry
"I did all the fight scenes in the film myself. I found it easier to concentrate on the physical actions than delivering dialogue and matching emotions to what they wanted. When it came time for me to cry on cue, that was difficult. The nude scene was also difficult, I didn't know if 50 should be naked, but it's real life so we did it."
From rapper to rock star
"I like rock music. I like the way the tempo and energy can change from soft to really hard and loud. The energy just goes up and down and I find that very exciting. One of my favourite bands is U2. We share the same label so Bono is a good friend of mine. I like the White Stripes as well; their first album was really good. I also like Maroon 5, they're cool."
First meeting with Eminem
"The first time I met Eminem he had flown me out to LA. He'd heard some of the stuff I'd put out on the mix tape circuit and he wanted to meet me. He was on the radio that morning and told the radio host that I was his favourite rapper, I didn't actually hear that until I was on my way to meet with him. When I met him he was so excited about doing a project with me, he was so excited he made me nervous! People feel like they know everything about him because of the issues raised in his songs. It's like everyone thinks they know all about his issues with his mum, Haley etc. So Curtain Call was just him saying ‘The shows over folks'."
Robbie takes on 50Cent
"Someone from Robbie Williams camp contacted me and said Robbie would like to meet me, sit down and have a talk. My schedule wouldn't actually allow me to go meet with him even though we were both doing the same show. There was a massive crowd of people at the show, some to see me, some to see him, and it was so manic I just didn't get a chance to meet him. Later the papers reported that he'd said some things about me. I did finally get to meet him in Germany when we were both doing a talk show. We talked for a while and he seemed a nice guy. So I figured he didn't say anything bad about me and the papers must have just made stuff up. So I can honestly say me and Robbie don't have a beef, we're good, we're cool."
Bullets
"I do wear a bullet proof vest sometimes, mostly when I'm back in New York. I grew up in an environment where the price of life is cheap. Everything can be interpreted from two sides. Some people will look at my life and it may inspire them, others will look at my life and be envious because they are so close to where I was."
Like Father like Son
"I like to think I'm a good parent. My son is great, he's good and smart. I think he's everything I was without the bad circumstances. I discipline him if he's done something he shouldn't have. But it's hard to discipline him when he's done something I know I did as a kid. He definitely has my character, my mannerisms. He'll do something he's not supposed to do but he'll do it exactly the way I would have done it. So I look at him and think, ‘Who told you to do that?'. He thinks I'm a superhero. I don't want to force him into a set direction in life, that's his choice, I can only help make his surroundings as good as possible and hope he's ok."
Matching bullet proof vests
"I wouldn't take my son anywhere where it was necessary for him to wear a bullet proof vest. But there was show we were doing and everyone had to wear the same costume for the effect of the show. He wanted to come on stage so badly, so I got the outfit made up for him - that's why people think I got him a bullet proof vest. But I didn't, we just made it look that way so he could have an outfit to match mine for the show."
50's future plans
"My goals keep changing. Right now, I'm excited about Mobb Deep. Their album is out soon and I'm really excited about it, I actually was the executive producer on the album so I'm really pleased with it. I won't release projects from my artists that aren't up to par. Dr Dre and Eminem, they are the standards I aim for when I make my music so I hold my artists to that same standard."
Going back to your roots
"I go back to my neighbourhood in Queens sometimes, usually when I'm feeling creative. I'll go sit on the bench I used to sit on and watch what's going on. My grandparents don't live in our house any more but they still own it. My spot in the basement is still there, I go back to it sometimes. It helps me get back that perspective of wanting to be successful so much. I can remember so many things when I go back there."
Money's too tight to mention
"I'm not really afraid of much. I'm conscious of people that aren't aware of their finances though. I've seen a lot of artists go up and come right back down again. We build entertainers up in order to destroy them, for the sake of entertainment. They adjust to this fabulous lifestyle and they think they're gonna life that way for the rest of their lives. When the finances come in at a really fast rate they adjust to it and stay at that pace even after the finances slow down. Then when they finally realise they've over done it they have to file for bankruptcy. I have great reminders not to end up like that. I wake up in my house every day knowing that the man that sold it to me did so because he couldn't afford to keep it, even though he earned $500million in his career - I own Mike Tyson's home in Connecticut."

Catch the full interview on Wednesday 1st February, ITV1 at 11.00pm, repeated on ITV2.


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