Last week may have seen the end of higher prices for larger bras but well endowed women are still paying the physical and psychological costs of bigger breasts a new report by MBT reveals today.  Despite being some of the best endowed in the world two thirds of British women report larger breasts are preventing them from keeping fit and healthy and over 37% from finding love.

Considered by many as an asset, larger breasts are actually linked to poor posture, which in turn brings a catalogue of physical and psychological effects. One in 10 women cite breasts as the reason for low confidence when it comes to dating or talking to men and up to a third suffer from pain when exercising (33%).

More worryingly, between 60 and 90% of women with large breasts have sought treatment for back pain or even considered more drastic action such as plastic surgery (22%) as a result of bigger breasts. Drew Barrymore and Jordan are just some of the celebrities who have seen the benefits of smaller breasts over the last couple of years and reflect the rising trend of breast reduction figures (up by 6% last year), which stand at almost a quarter of breast enhancements.

Whilst women are becoming more aware of the benefits of a better fitting bra, after Gok Wan and retailer education programmes, it seems boob size is not just linked to physical effects but also psychological.

Chartered Physiotherapist, Joshua Wies, the Director of the MBT Academy and posture expert comments: "We’re on a mission to help straighten up Britain in an attempt to help improve the nation’s confidence and self esteem.  It’s well documented how larger breast size can create back pain and poor posture but our research also unearths some of the far-reaching psychological and sociological effects. 

Wearing a better fitting bra is paramount as it helps pull in the weight of the breasts closer to the body reducing the strain on the back. However, having stronger core muscles can also help support the spine as can reducing your BMI, which is linked to large bra sizes."