Horror movies have, and always will be one of the most popular franchises, with some of the best including A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) and Scream (1996). However, despite the original Halloween releasing in 1978, the 2018 revamp of the movie was something to behold.

The Shape / Picture Credit: Blumhouse Productions

The Shape / Picture Credit: Blumhouse Productions

Halloween (2018) is a genuinely brilliant horror experience. While not filled with action sequences or high-speed chases, the movie invites you in to, istead, slowly see Michael Myers (sometimes also called The Shape) take life after life, not stopping for consideration or remorse.

Michael Myers is part of the ‘holy trinity of horror villains’, which also includes Jason Voorhees from the Friday the 13th franchise, and Freddy Krueger from the A Nightmare on Elm Street franchise; with Ghostface from the Scream series just missing the cut.

The thing we all know about Michael is that, in addition to always walking and never running, is that he has not spoken a single word in any of his movies. This is a clever choice for the people behind his creation, as the plain white mask and kitchen knife is enough to make your blood curdle.

In 2018’s Halloween, we mainly follow Allyson (Andi Matichak), granddaughter of the famed Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis). Allyson wishes her mother, Karen (Judy Greer), would let her speak to her grandmother more often, but Karen’s traumatic childhood of preparing for Michael Myers’ return has meant she keeps her own mother at arm’s length.

Judy Greer and Jamie Lee Curtis in Halloween / Picture Credit: Blumhouse Productions
Judy Greer and Jamie Lee Curtis in Halloween / Picture Credit: Blumhouse Productions

However, at Halloween time, Michael is being moved from a psychiatric unit to a maximum-security prison to live out his days; he has spent the past 40 years in confinement, and has still not uttered one word.

His escape, following the transfer bus crashing, means that death now looms around Haddonfield like a moth to a flame. The film then follows Laurie and her family as they try to fight Michael off; despite their efforts, it seems that The Shape isn’t done just yet...

Halloween is a direct sequel to the 1978 movie, meaning the films in between are now null and void. It seems that this was a bold yet strong choice, as the 2018 feature was an instant hit; it went down so well with audiences that it sparked a trilogy, the second part being Halloween Kills which is in cinemas October 15th, 2021.

What makes the 2018 movie so incredible, is the atmosphere. Some horror movies struggle to utilise sounds in the right ways (whether it be the theme tune or generic music), but Halloween knows exactly when to turn up the volume to create a genuinely harrowing scene.

Andi Matichak in Halloween / Picture Credit: Blumhouse Productions
Andi Matichak in Halloween / Picture Credit: Blumhouse Productions

Michael’s music is rather amazing, as a simple piano tune can send literal shivers down your spine. While it isn’t always used when Michael is in shot, it is always effective in slowing down the pace to a terrifying halt, therefore leaving room for the ruthless serial killer to take up space in your mind whether he is in the shot or not.

Halloween also seems to refuse to play the humour card, which has worked well in its favour. Some, not all, horror films feel the need to undercut some of the tension caused by a murderer or monster after them, by cracking a joke or two - and it doesn’t always work out.

Here, the lack of humour simply drills in the idea that there is no release from Michael’s wrath. His domineering, almost 7ft tall stature paints him as a legitimately scary villain that holds your attention for every second he is on screen.

Michael Myers / Picture Credit: Blumhouse Productions
Michael Myers / Picture Credit: Blumhouse Productions

Another thing 2018’s Halloween does really well, is carry on the legend of the 1978 feature but bring it into modern times. Despite the base story being rather similar, being that Michael is out for blood, it is done in a new and harrowing way that instils a real-life fear in audiences.

With both films being around 40 years apart, the 2018 version holds all the charm and horror of the original, but moves the story forward giving us new characters (Laurie’s family) but with a classic, late 70s feel.

Not only is this movie perfect to watch around this time of year, just around the corner from Halloween, but it is a horror masterpiece that understands itself; it knows when music is needed and doesn’t feel the need (like many other horrors do) to let sex sell the film.

Halloween is a simple yet incredibly effective horror movie. Its villain is perhaps one of cinema’s most brutal and unforgiving, as his rampage seems unprovoked - making him an inherently evil character.

Jamie Lee Curtis in Halloween / Picture Credit: Blumhouse Productions
Jamie Lee Curtis in Halloween / Picture Credit: Blumhouse Productions

Michael is also an interesting villain, as while he appears to be just a regular (if not psychotic) man, he survives any onslaught that comes his way. He has been shot multiple times, including in the face and chest, has been hit by a car at least once, and has had two or three fingers blown off, all without cries of pain; and this is just in the 2018 film...

He is an unstoppable, terrifying and screen-dominating villain who walks towards his victims and, no matter how fast they run, always seems to catch up.

Halloween (2018) is an incredible, thrilling and horrifying experience that does everything right. They continued to have a brilliant, genuinely scary villain, a great plot, it introduces two more great main characters (Laurie’s family), and creates the perfect, haunting atmosphere in which to enjoy the rampage of The Shape himself.

Watch the trailer for Halloween (2018) below:

Written by Melissa, who you can follow on Twitter @melissajournal

RELATED: Scream revisited: An outstanding, self-aware, horror classic


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